WHAT IS SEXUAL HARASSMENT & WHAT TO DO

THAT’S HARASSMENT

In partnership with the Ad Council, the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN) and the National Women’s Law Center (NWLC), That’s Harassment is a PSA campaign to empower victims and bystanders to speak out against sexual harassment and provide tools for employers to create a safe work environment.

KEY ARTICLES

Bystander Intervention Resources

This online resource collection offers advocates and preventionists information and resources on bystander intervention. It includes resources to use with co-workers, community members, as well as information and research on the effectiveness of bystander intervention.

This is not a comprehensive list of all of the materials related to sexual violence and the bystander intervention; however, these materials are all available online. Check out the top resources on bystander intervention in the NSVRC library.

This 4 part collection was developed for use by advocates, preventionists, and community members. The parts of the collection are listed below:

Background and General Information
NSVRC Publications and Resources
Online Learning Opportunities
Campaigns and Programs

This collection supports the NSVRC Engaging Bystanders to Prevent Sexual Violence Information Packet.

Background and General Information

This section provides background and general information on the bystander approach to sexual violence. Advocates, preventionists, and community members can use these resources to learn about bystander intervention and how it is an effective approach to preventing sexual violence.

Bystanders: Agents of Primary Prevention (16 p.) by Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs (2010). This newsletter is entirely devoted to the bystander intervention approach to primary prevention and explores various campaigns.

Research on Bystander Programs Highlighted in Journal (webpage) by David Lee (2011). This webpost discusses research on bystander intervention programs. Listen to the accompanying podcast of the article.

Bystander Approaches: Responding to and Preventing Men’s Violence Against Women (20 p.) by Australian Centre for the Study of Sexual Assault (2014). This article discusses the bystander approach to sexual violence prevention, an overview of successful programs and best practices, and includes a discussion of challenges to implementing a program.

Encourage. Support. Act! Bystander Approaches to Sexual Harassment in the Workplace (29 p.) by Paula McDonlad & Michael Flood (2012). This report discusses how the bystander approach can be used to combat sexual harassment in the workplace.

Stop Sexual Violence: A Sexual Violence Bystander Intervention Toolkit (36 p.) by New York State Department of Health (2013). This toolkit describes the bystander approach and provides information on engaging with different populations such as youth, men, and women. An extensive list of resources and bystander campaigns is also available.

Moving Beyond Individual Level Bystander Intervention Strategies: Why & How? (2 p.) by Hannah Larson, Jennifer Rauhouse & Shana Tobkin (2011). Through work with the STAND & SERVE initiative, these preventionists discuss making bystander intervention an action-oriented approach to prevention.

A Different World is Possible: Promising Practices to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls (66 p.) By María Baños Smith (2011). This report discusses 15 innovative case studies of promising prevention programs in the United Kingdom. Programs highlighted include workshops with boys, programs working with drama groups and girls at risk, and training bystanders to intervene to challenge the attitudes of their peers.

Sexual Violence Prevention Through Bystander Education: An experimental evaluation (19 p.) by Victoria L. Banyard, Mary M Moynihan, and Elizabethe G. Plante (2007). This research article presents the results of a study evaluating the effectiveness of a bystander education program. The study found that both men and women who participated showed positive changes in behaviors over time.

ALLIES & SECONDARY SURVIVORS

WHAT IS INTERSECTIONALITY

DOWNLOADABLES

STUDIES

SEXUAL HARASSMENT REPORTING TECHNOLOGY

AllVoices

The web platform will let people anonymously report their experiences of sexual harassment at work, and will in turn aggregate that data to give companies insights on the true scale of the problem.

We Said Enough

WSE’s Digital Platform creates a community of survivors, volunteers and activists who can provide immediate social support to victims of sexual harassment, abuse and bullying along with needed restorative resources to begin the healing process.

Callisto

Callisto is a non-profit organization that creates technology to combat sexual assault and harassment. Their technology is designed to empower survivors with options to seek support and identify repeat perpetrators.

The Silent Choir Project

A closed and private network for victims of sexual harassment and abuse. Survivors can report an incident and identify their perpetrator through social media.

Safecity

An online platform that lets women immediately and anonymously report their experiences of harassment and abuse.

Hollaback!

Started in New York and now operates in 26 countries including Australia, Ecuador, Kenya and the U.K. provides women with an outlet to safely, discreetly report harassment.

10 THINGS MEN CAN DO TO PREVENT GENDER VIOLENCE

We all have a role in preventing violence. That’s why The Representation Project is proud to feature this list of “Ten Things Men Can Do to Prevent Gender Violence” by our friend and partner Dr. Jackson Katz.

1. APPROACH GENDER VIOLENCE AS A MEN’S ISSUE

Approach sexual harrassment and forms of gender violence as a MEN’S issue involving men of all ages and socioeconomic, racial, and ethnic backgrounds. View men not only as perpetrators or possible offenders, but as empowered bystanders who can confront abusive peers.

2. DON’T REMAIN SILENT

If a brother, friend, classmate, or teammate is abusing his female partner – or is disrespectful or abusive to girls and women in general – don’t look the other way. If you feel comfortable doing so, try to talk to him about it. Urge him to seek help. Or if you don’t know what to do, consult a friend, a parent, a professor, or a counselor. DON’T REMAIN SILENT.

3. HAVE THE COURAGE TO LOOK INWARD

Question your own attitudes. Don’t be defensive when something you do or say ends up hurting someone else. Try hard to understand how your own attitudes and actions might inadvertently perpetuate sexism and violence, and work toward changing them.

4. ASK IF YOU CAN HELP

If you suspect that a woman close to you is being abused or has been sexually assaulted, gently ask if you can help.

5. GET HELP

If you are emotionally, psychologically, physically, or sexually abusive to women, or have been in the past, seek professional help NOW.

6. JOIN THE CAUSE

Be an ally to women who are working to end all forms of gender violence. Support the women whose courage and empowered voices have catalyzed the historic #MeToo movement. Attend “Take Back the Night” rallies and other public events. Raise money for community-based rape-crisis centers and battered women’s shelters. If you belong to a team, fraternity, or another student group, organize a fundraiser.

7. BE AN ALLY

Recognize and speak out against homophobia and gay-bashing. Discrimination and violence against LGBTQ people are wrong in and of themselves. This abuse also has direct links to sexism (e.g. the gender identity and sexual orientation of men who speak out against sexism is often questioned, a conscious or unconscious strategy intended to silence them. This is a key reason few men do so).

8. EDUCATE YOURSELF

Attend programs, take courses, watch films, and read articles and books about multicultural masculinities, gender inequality, and the root causes of gender violence. Educate yourself and others about how larger social forces affect the conflicts between individual men and women.

9. VOTE WITH YOUR DOLLARS AND ATTENTION

Don’t fund sexism. Refuse to purchase any magazine, rent any video, subscribe to any website, or buy any music that portrays girls or women in a sexually degrading or abusive manner. Speak out about cyber-sexism and misogynist attacks against women on social media sites such as Instagram, Snapchat, Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Reddit, etc. Protest sexism in new and old media.

10. MENTOR OTHERS

Mentor and teach young boys about how to be men in ways that don’t involve degrading or abusing girls and women (or men). Volunteer to work with gender violence prevention programs, including anti-sexist men’s programs. Lead by example.

This content was produced by MVP Strategies, a gender violence prevention education and training organization.

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

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THE MASK YOU LIVE IN

The Mask You Live In follows boys and young men as they struggle to stay true to themselves while negotiating America’s narrow definition of masculinity. Learn more about the documentary now.

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GETTING MEN TO SPEAK UP

A primer for men who want to be allies by Michael Kimmel. Read the full article

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PEOPLE’S GUIDE TO ANTI-SEXIST MEN’S ACTIVISM

In the four decades since women invited men to work to end men’s violence against women—and to transform restrictive, conventional masculinity into an openhearted reimagined masculinities—a growing number of grassroots organizations, practical initiatives and innovative projects have emerged around the world. Thank you to Voice Male Magazine for compiling and letting us feature this list of organizations engaged in this work.

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MEN’S SILENCE AT THE GOLDEN GLOBES: DON’T WORRY, WE FIXED IT FOR YOU

Let’s assume you want things to be better for everyone, you just literally do not know what to say. Well don’t worry, here are some remarks you can use.

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THE MAN BOX REPORT

The Man Box report, launched by Promundo, is a study on young men’s attitudes, behaviors, and understandings of manhood. The research, conducted with a representative, random sample of young men aged 18 to 30 in the US, UK, and Mexico, reveals that most men still feel pushed to live in the “Man Box” – a rigid construct of cultural ideas about male identity. This includes being self-sufficient, acting tough, looking physically attractive, sticking to rigid gender roles, being heterosexual, having sexual prowess, and using aggression to resolve conflicts.

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THAT’S HARASSMENT

In partnership with the Ad Council, the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN) and the National Women’s Law Center (NWLC), That’s Harassment is a PSA campaign to empower victims and bystanders to speak out against sexual harassment and provide tools for employers to create a safe work environment.

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TEACHING ABOUT THE #METOO MOMENT AND SEXUAL HARASSMENT

Christopher Pepper, a health educator in the San Francisco Unified School District, co-wrote these lessons with the New York Times Learning Network on how to talk to students about the #MeToo Movement and Sexual Harassment.

Sexual harassment affects thousands of people in the workforce every year and still sexual harassment is not widely understood. This infographic tool breaks down the important aspects and shed light on the complex issue of sexual harassment in the workplace.

This content was produced by The Representation Project.

GRAPHICS

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